Wabanaki Trail Map

Click the icons on the map to see additional information.

Kennebec River Penobscot River Dead River St. Croix River St. John River The Allagash Moosehead Lake East Grand Lake Grand Lake Stream Machias River Chamberlain Lake Chesuncook Lake Millinocket Lake Pemadumcook Lake Flagstaff Lake Sebago Lake
Micmac Cultural Community Education Center Museum Indian Township Museum Waponahki Musuem & Resource Center Princess Watawahso’s Teepee & Family Museum Penobscot Nation Cultural & Historic Preservation Department Penobscot Nation Museum The Hudson Museum The Abbe Museum The Maine State Museum
Penobscot River
Indian Island
Augusta
Bangor
St. John River
Moosehead Lake
Eagle Lake
Kennebec River
Machias
Allagash River
Blue Hill
Quaggy Joe Mt.
Meduxnekeag River
Rockland
Bar Harbor
Mt. Katahdin
Pleasant Point
Indian Township
Passamaquoddy Bay
St. Croix River

Penobscot River Area

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
Penobscot RiverBun-ur-wub-skeag(place of the white rocks)

Penobscot River Area

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Indian IslandAl-na-beh-menhan(the peoples island)
2. Pushaw LakeBee-gwa-dag-om-ok(lake of submerged shoals)
3. Marsh IslandWaz-up-skek menhan(slippery ledge island)
4. Sunkhaze Streamzuk-hey-ess(outlet that comes into view from concealment)
5. Stillwater Riverm’skeeht-duk(place where the water is still)

Penobscot River Area

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. BangorBem-a-jiju-wok(where the current tumbles downward)
2. Kenduskeag StreamKadusk-keeht-duk(stream with water parsnips,eel weir place)
3. Brewerguk’sko-zee-be-dee-geh(dwellings among the the cedars)
4. Hampden Narrowseda-la-wik-kee-dee-muk(place where they make markings or writings)

Penobscot River Area

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Blue HillAwan-adjoAwan-adjo(Fog Mountain)
2. Fort KnoxK’tchi-peskwahon’daK’tchi’-peskwahon’da(big guns)
3. Verona IslandAh-lur-meh’-sicAh-lur-meh’-sic(spawning island)
4. Eggemoggin ReachK’chi-siti-mokan’ganK’chi-siti-mokan’gan(the great fish weir)

Penobscot River Area

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. RocklandKut-a-wam-tek(the great landing place)
2. IslesboroBeeda-beg-gwee-menhan(island that lies between two channels)
3. Lincolnville BeachMag-win’teg’wakMag-win’teg’wak(choppy seas))
4. Camden HarborMeg-un’ti-cookMeg-un’-ti-cook(big mountain harbor)
4. Owls HeadGoo-gooh-khaz-wa-d’bec((the owl’s head))

Penobscot River Area

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Mt. KatahdinKtah-den(big or large mountain)
2. MedwayNee-g’dow(forked outlet)
3. Millinocket LakeMee-l’na’gek(where there are islands of variable shapes)
4. Pemadumcook LakeBem-me-dum-keeh-luk(where the sand bar extends along with the current)
5. Nesowadnehunk StreamNesaw-wa-den-aht’duk(stream that flows between the mountains)
6. East Branch of the PenobscotWah-seht-d’tuk(stream of light)
7. Mattawamkeag RiverMad-ah-wam-kek(at the place of the elevated gravel of sand bar)

Washington/Hancock County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Pleasant PointSipayikSipayik(along the edge)
2. Cobscook BayKapskukKapskuk(boiling rock under water)
3. Campobello IslandEpakuwitkEpakuwitk(floating between)
4. Dennys RiverKethonoskKethonosk(place to gather animal scent)

Washington/Hancock County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Indian TownshipMotahkomikukMotahkomikuk(on the sloping land)
2. WoodlandWapskonikonokWapskonikonok(white rock carry)
3. Meddybemps LakeMotopehsokMotopehsok(alewives place)
4. Pennamaquan LakePenomahqanihkukPenomahqanihkuk(place where we get maple syrup)
5. Magurrewock StreamMekaluwakakomMekaluwakakom(place of the caribou)

Washington/Hancock County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Passamaquoddy BayPestomakatiPestomakati(place to spear pollock)

Washington/Hancock County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. MachiasMoceyiskMoceyisk(bad little falls)
2. East MachiasKepamkewisKepamkewis(little sand bar closing off)

Washington/Hancock County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. St. Croix RiverSkutikSkutik(Burnt land along river)
2. St. Croix IslandMehtonuwekossMehtonuwekoss(little out of food place)

Washington/Hancock County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Bar HarborMoneskatikMoneskatik(clam digging place)

Aroostook County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Meduxnekeag RiverMeduxnekeagMeduxnekeag(where it is rocky at its mouth)

Aroostook County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Quaggy Joe Mt.QuaquajoQuaquajo(boundary mountain)

Aroostook County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Eagle LakeQuesawalmuiqueQuesawalmuique(place of maple trees)
2. Long LakeWaisquetcheWaisquetche(the last or the end)
3. Square LakePetquamickPetquamick(round)

Aroostook County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. St. John RiverWolastookWolastook(beautiful river)
2. MadawaskaMatawaskiyakMatawaskiyak(where one river flows into another with watergrass)
3. St. Francis RiverAmilcungantiquakeAmilcungantiquake(the banks of the river that abound with meat for drying)

Aroostook County

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Allagash RiverWala-gwes-sqweeht-duk(bark stream)
2. Umsaskis LakeUnsaskukUn-sus-skook(bead together)
3. Round PondPataquangamissBada-gwug-ah-miss(round pond)

Western Maine

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Moosehead LakeMoz-ah-dabaa-gum(moose head)
2. Chesuncook LakeKchi-za-gook(at the big outlet)
3. Umbazooksus StreamAh-ba-zoohk-sis(much meadow stream)
4. Chamberlain LakeUp-moo-gwen-ah-ha-mook(lake that is crossed, inlet and outlet at opposite sides)

Western Maine

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. Kennebec RiverGin-geh-gweeht-duk(large expanse of water)

Western Maine

PlaceWabanakiPronunciationMeaning
1. AugustaCushnocCushnoc(head of the tide)
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Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians

Aroostook Band of Micmac IndiansThe federal government recognized the Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians on November 26, 1991. Since their recognition, the tribe has acquired over 1,300 acres of land. The majority of tribal members live in the cities of Presque Isle, Caribou, and Houlton, Maine. Read More...


Points of Interest Accommodations Restaurants Directions

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Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians

Houlton Band of Maliseet IndiansThe Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians was federally recognized on October 10, 1980 as part of the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act. The Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, or Metaksonikewiyik (People of the Meduxnekeag) currently have approximately 1,240 acres of farm and commercial land holdings (in both fee and trust status) in Aroostook County Maine. Much of the land borders the Meduxnekeag River, a critical link in preserving tribal practices, traditions and history. Read More...


Points of Interest Accommodations Restaurants Directions

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Penobscot Indian Nation

Penobscot Indian NationThe Penobscot Nation owns about 148,525 acres of land in Maine. The land includes almost 200 islands on the Penobscot River, which are part of the tribes traditional pre-colonial territory. The remaining lands were purchased through the Land Acquisition Fund, which was established through a federal appropriations bill signed by President Carter in 1980. Read More...


Points of Interest Accommodations Restaurants Directions

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Passamaquoddy Tribe Indian Township

Passamaquoddy Tribe Indian TownshipThe Indian Township (Motahkomikuk - On the sloping land) Reservation is the largest reservation in the state of Maine. Indian Township consists of two neighborhoods-- Peter Dana Point is located at Big Lake, and Indian Township overlooks Lewy Lake. The Treaty of 1794 between the tribe and Commonwealth of Massachusetts established the Indian Township Reservation. Read More...

Points of Interest Accommodations Restaurants Directions

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Passamaquoddy Tribe Pleasant Point

Passamaquoddy Tribe Pleasant PointThe Pleasant Point (Sipayik) Reservation consists of its original 100 acres, plus 112 acres of annexed land authorized by the state of Maine. Sipayik, the primary Passamaquoddy village since 1770, is located at the Pleasant Point Reservation. It is situated on a promontory in Passamaquoddy Bay. Read More...

Points of Interest Accommodations Restaurants Directions

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The Hudson Museum

Hudson MuseumCollins Center for the Arts, University of Maine, Orono, Maine

www.umaine.edu/hudsonmuseum

The Maine Indian collection consists of more than 500 objects including baskets, basketry tools, crooked knives, root clubs, beadwork, birchbark objects and three birchbark canoes. These objects are presented in the Maine Indian Gallery with audio and video footage of contemporary Maine Indian artists. Located on the second floor of the Collins Center for the Arts the Hudson Museum recently underwent renovations that allows even more objects from their collection to be displayed. The museum also houses a world class collection of Precolumbian ceramics and gold work dating from the 2000 BC to the time of the Spanish Conquest; Native American objects from the Southwest, Northwest Coast, Plains, and Arctic.

Phone: 207.581.1901

Email: hudsonmueum@umit.maine.edu

Museum Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm, Saturday 11:00 am -4:00 pm, closed Sundays and holidays

Admission: Free

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The Abbe Museum

Abbe Museum 26 Mount Desert Street, Bar Harbor, Maine

www.abbemuseum.org

Located in downtown Bar Harbor, the Abbe Museum focuses on the the history and culture of Maine’s Native people, the Wabanaki. The museum offers innovative changing exhibitions, special programs and talks, teacher workshops, archaeology field schools, and crafts workshops. The museum has a large gift shop with baskets, jewelry, carvings, and artwork from Wabanaki artists. A second location, featuring archeology exhibits, is open from spring through fall at Sieur de Monts Spring in Acadia National Park. For information about prehistoric, historic, and contemporary Native people of Maine the  Abbe Museum is a must see.

Phone: 207.288.3519

Email: info@abbemuseum.org

Museum Hours: May through Mid October, Daily 10 am - 5 pm, call for winter hours

Admission: Adults $3, Children (ages 6-15) $1, Free to Native Americans and Abbe members.

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The Penobscot Nation Museum

Penobscot Nation Museum 12 Down Street, Indian Island, Maine

www.penobscotculture.com/museum

This small and informative museum is dedicated to to preserving and sharing the rich cultural heritage of the Penobscot and Wabanaki people. The museum’s collections span thousands of years of history from prehistoric stone tools, ceremonial root clubs, a birch bark canoe, clothing, beadwork, photographs, and a large collection of brown ash and sweetgrass basketry. The Penobscot Nation Museum promotes respect for their people, heritage, and strong connection to the Earth and their ancestors. Small gift shop offering books, videos, and gifts.

Phone: 207.827.4153

Email: firekpr@hotmail.com

Museum Hours: Monday through Thursday 9 am - 2 pm, Saturday by appointment

Admission: donations appreciated, small fee for groups of 10 or more.

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Penobscot Nation Cultural & Historic Preservation Department

2 Sarah Springs Drive, Suite 2, Indian Island, Maine

www.penobscotculture.com

Take a tour of Indian Island with of of the department’s knowledgeable and friendly guides. A trained guide will take you to visit many of the the Penobscot Nation’s buildings, departments, and programs; as well as the Penobscot Cultural Medicine Trail, a boardwalk trail featuring sculptures by Penobscot artist Tim Shay.   The department also runs Che’Molly’s Trading Post selling books, videos, and Penobscot crafts.

Phone: 207.817.7477

Email: info@penobscotculture.com

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Princess Watawahso’s Teepee & Family Museum

1 Down Street, Indian Island, Maine

http://charlesnormanshay.com

Princess_Watahwasos_TeepeeBuilt in 1947 by Penobscot tribal member Lucy Nicolar Poolaw and her Kiowa husband Bruce Poolaw, the two story wooden teepee quickly became a tourist attraction and popular Indian basket and craft shop.  One of the first buildings seen as you cross the bridge to Indian Island, it has been lovingly restored by Lucy’s nephew Charles Norman Shay. The teepee now serves as a family museum dedicated to the memory of Mr. Shay’s relatives, ancestors, and to the history of the Penobscot Nation.

Phone 207.827.5744

Email: charlesnshay@aol.com

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The Maine State Museum

MSM_logo 230 State Street, Augusta, Maine

http://mainestatemuseum.org

The Maine State Museum features exhibits focused on the prehistory, history, and the environment of Maine. The exhibit ‘12,000 Years in Maine’ walks you through thousands of years of Maine’s human prehistory and features over 2,000 archeological objects.  Four floors of exhibits, educational programs, and thousands of objects make this an fun and educational place to spend a day.

Phone: 207.287.2301

Museum Hours: Tuesday through Friday 9 am - 5 pm, Saturday 10 am - 4 pm. Closed Sunday, Monday, state holidays and state government closure days.

Admission: Adults $2, Children (ages 6-18) $1, children under 6 - free; family maximum charge - $6; Senior citizens (62 and older) $1

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Micmac Cultural Community Education Center Museum

7 Northern Road, Presque Isle, Maine

www.micmac-nsn.gov/html/museum.html

If the road leads you to northern Maine, stop in and visit the the Micmac Cultural Community Education Center and see their exhibit about the Micmac people and culture.

Phone 207.764.1972

Museum Hours: Monday, through Friday 8 am - 4 pm

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Waponahki Musuem & Resource Center

59 Passamaquoddy Road, Pleasant Point, Maine

www.wabanaki.com/museum

Dedicated to the preservation of language and culture, the Waponahki Museum has on display numerous ash and sweetgrass baskets, basketry tools, beaded artifacts, snowshoes, historic photographs, fishing nets and sinkers. Also on display is the  birchbark artwork of Tomah Joseph, a Passamaquoddy artist who developed a close relationship with former President Franklin D. Roosevelt. One of Tomah Joseph’s intricately decorated birchbark canoes may be seen at the museum.

Phone: 207.853.2600 ext. 227

Museum Hours:  Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9 am - 12 noon

Admission: $5 per person

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Indian Township Museum

Indian Township MuseumUS Route 1, Indian Township, Maine

Located just 30 miles north of Calais, the Indian Township Museum is a must see if you are in the area. Featuring a large collection of ash and sweetgrass basketry, porcupine quill baskets, beadwork, regalia, historic photographs, war clubs, paddles, and birchbark work - including some by Tomah Joseph. There is also a gift shop with crafts, books, CDs, and DVDs by Passamaquoddy tribal members for sale.

Phone: 207.796.5533

Email: soctomah@ainop.com

Museum Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 am - 4 pm

Admission: Free

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Penobscot River

Penobscot River

For thousands of years the Penobscot River has been the center of the Penobscot Nation and their territory. The longest river in Maine at 240 miles, and the second largest river system in New England, it drains 8,570 square miles. The word Penobscot is an anglicized version of Pannawambskek which describes the river between Indian Island and Bangor and means "place of the white rocks". This was an important canoe route river, with the East and West Branches, and major tributaries (the Passadumkeag, the Piscataquis, and Mattawamkeag) connecting the Penobscot to all parts of central and northern Maine and in to Canada. The Penobscots retained the islands in the Penobscot River above Marsh Island and these now make up the Penobscot Reservation, with the main village at Indian Island.

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Machias River

sm_machias_river_falls_donald_soctomahThe Machias River flows through the heart of Passamaquoddy territory. Wild and free flowing, Machias in Passamaquoddy means "bad little falls" and aptly describes the many challenging rapids along this river. The Machias River Corridor has been designated a "Globally Important Bird Area", and is also an important river for wild Atlantic salmon. Machias Bay is the site of petroglyphs etched into the rocks over 3,000 years ago by the ancestors of the Passamaquoddy people.

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St. Croix River

sm_st_croix_river_st_croix_island_donald_soctomahAt 62 miles long, the St. Croix River forms part of the eastern boundary between Maine and New Brunswick, Canada. One of the earliest attempts at settlement by the French occurred on St. Croix Island in 1604. The river flows through Passamaquoddy territory and is a major river for populations of Atlantic salmon.

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Dead River

Dead River

Wild, scenic, and remote the Dead River originates near the Canadian border and flows to The Forks where it enters the Kennebec River. This area is good fishing, great scenery and waterfalls. In the summer whitewater rafting trips leave from the Forks.

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Moosehead Lake

Moosehead Lake

Forty miles long by ten miles wide, Moosehead Lake is the largest lake in Maine. The headwaters of the Kennebec River and West Branch of the Penobscot River originates here. In the mid 19th century writer Henry David Thoreau made two trips to this area with Penobscot guides from Indian Island. On his second trip, with his guide Joe Polis, he traveled though Moosehead Lake connecting with the West Branch of the Penobscot, north to Chamberlain Lake, and then connected though Webster Brook to the East Branch of the Penobscot River to return to Bangor. Surrounded by mountains and forests Moosehead Lake remains the gateway to the North Maine Woods and a mecca for eco-tourists, fishermen, hunters, and snowmobilers.

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The Allagash

sm_allagash_lake_Northwoods_WaysThe Allagash River and the many connected lakes and deadwaters that make it up were an important canoe route for Wabanaki people to travel between the Kennebec, and the Penobscot River systems to the St John. In 1966 the Allagash Wilderness Waterway was established by the State of Maine protecting 92 miles of river, lakes, and shoreline. Motorized boats are prohibited along sections of this waterway.

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St. John River

sm_St_John_river_2_North_Woods_WaysThe St John River flows through Micmac and Maliseet territories. At 410 miles long it drains over 21,000 square miles in the United States and Canada, and flows through 100 miles of undeveloped forest. The river forms 70 miles of boundary between Maine and New Brunswick. It is a popular fishing river for Muskellunge and small mouth bass. Known for it’s difficult rapids it is best paddled with a guide.

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East Grand Lake & Grand Lake Stream

This area is world famous for it’s excellent landlocked salmon fishing and the “Grand Laker Canoe”. There are many interconnected lakes in this area including Big Lake, Long Lake, and Lewey Lake the home of the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Indian Township. Since the 1800’s Passamaquoddy guides have been guiding hunters, fishermen, and tourists into their territory.

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East Grand Lake & Grand Lake Stream

This area is world famous for it’s excellent landlocked salmon fishing and the “Grand Laker Canoe”. There are many interconnected lakes in this area including Big Lake, Long Lake, and Lewey Lake the home of the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Indian Township. Since the 1800’s Passamaquoddy guides have been guiding hunters, fishermen, and tourists into their territory.

Grand Lake Stream
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Kennebec River

The Kennebec River originates at Moosehead Lake and flows south for 150 miles to empty into Merrymeeting Bay on the coast. This was the the territory of bands of Eastern Abenaki who were displaced in the wars of the 18th century. After a devastating attack by the English on the native village of Norridgewock, survivors moved into Canada or joined with the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy tribes. Today, the river is known for it’s great fishing, canoeing, and whitewater rafting.

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Chamberlain Lake

Merganser chicks, by North Woods WaysChamberlain Lake is the largest lake in the Allagash Wilderness Waterway System, covering over 11,000 acres. Strong winds can make this a challenging paddle for canoeists, but worth it for the scenery, wildlife viewing, and secluded camping sites. Before 1841 the water in Chamberlain Lake flowed north eventually reaching the St. John River. The American lumber industry wanted logs cut from this area to reach Bangor, which was known at the time as the lumber capital of the world, and so devised a plan to reverse the flow of the lake by way of tdams and canals. By 1841 the two dams and canals that connected Chamberlain Lake to Telos Lake; and Telos Lake to Webster Lake were completed. From Webster Lake logs would then flow into Mattagamon connecting with the East Branch of the Penobscot River, then joining with the Penobscot River at Medway for the rest of the journey south to Bangor.

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Chesuncook Lake

sm_chesuncook_sunrise_with_mt_katahdin_Northwoods_Ways

One of the largest lakes in Maine, the Chesuncook Lake we know today was formed by the damming of the West branch of the Penobscot River in 1903. The dam caused Ripogenus, Caribou, Cheuncook Lakes to merge together into one large lake. In the Penobscot language Chesuncook means, “at the big outlet”. It was, and still is, an important canoe trail location. From the north end of the lake canoeists can connect south and west by way of the West Branch of the Penobscot to Moosehead Lake and the Kennebec River; or north to the St. John River by way of Umbazooksus Stream to the Allagash; or to other points west by Caucomgomoc Steam.

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Millinocket Lake

In the Penobscot language Millinocket translates to “where there are islands of variable shapes”, referring to the Islands in the Penobscot River in that area. Millinocket Lake was formed by the Millinocket Lake Dam which was completed in 1910 for hydropower for the paper industry. The lake covers 8,960 acres and has great views of Mt. Katahdin. Millinocket Lake is a popular fishing spot for landlocked salmon, lake trout, and white perch.

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Pemadumcook Lake

Pemadumcook Lake is one of a series of large lakes which include Ambajejus, Elbow, and North and South Twin Lakes which are part of the West Branch of the Penobscot River. Together these lakes make up the fifth largest lake system in Maine. In Penobscot Pemadumcook means, “where the sand bar extends with the current”. The lake contains Trout, Togue, and landlocked Atlantic Salmon. Pemadumcook Lake was visited by Henry David Thoreau in 1846.Pemadumcook Region

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Flagstaff Lake

Flagstaff Lake

In 1950 the Dead River was impounded by the Long Falls Dam, enlarging Flagstaff Lake to its size today. The hydropower dam submerged the townships of Flagstaff, Bigelow, Dead River, and Carrying Place. The lake is very shallow reaching a maximum depth of only 48 feet. The lake is located in the beautiful western mountains of Maine.

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Sebago Lake

Sebago Lake

Sebago translates to “great stretch of water”, and is an accurate description. Covering 30,513 acres, Sebago Lake is Maine’s second largest lake. Its depth reaches 316 ft at its deepest point. The area is a popular tourist destination known for its scenery, fishing, fall foliage, and ice fishing. Sebago Lake State Park is open year round. Sebago Lake is also the primary water supply for the greater Portland region.

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Mount Kineo

Mount Kineo

Rising majestically out of the waters of Moosehead Lake, Mt. Kineo was of vital importance to prehistoric Wabanaki tribes. Kineo’s 700 foot cliffs are made from a type of rhyolite that is of the highest quality for making stone tools. This stone was highly prized and was carried or traded throughout New England and as far away as New York State, Pennsylvania, and Canada. A boat ride across Moosehead Lake will take you to the island where there are hiking trails for climbing.

Mount Kineo Website

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Cadillac Mountain

Cadillac MountainOne of the first mountains revealed after the retreat of the massive glacier that covered Maine, Cadillac Mountain, on Mt. Desert Island, is one of the first places in the United States to receive the light of the rising sun. Cadillac and the surrounding mountains were called Pemetic which means "mountains seen at a distance" and were a landmark when traveling by ocean. Now encompassed within the boundaries of Acadia National Park you can hike or drive to the summit. The views from this pink granite mountain are spectacular.

Cadillac Mountain Website

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Sugarloaf Mountain

Sugar Loaf Mountain

Located in the western mountains, Sugarloaf is the second highest peak in Maine. In the past the western Maine mountains were home to various bands of Eastern Abenaki, until they retreated into Canada in the wars of the 18th century. Today Sugarloaf Mountain is the site of the largest ski area east of the Rockies. In the summer the area is a popular destination for fly fishing, chairlift rides, zip-line tours, and hiking.

Sugarloaf Mountain Website

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Mount Katahdin

Mount Katahdin

Nestled between the East and West Branches of the Penobscot River, Mt. Katahdin is the highest mountain in Maine at 5,270 ft. Katahdin means "the big or great mountain" and is considered a sacred mountain to the Penobscot and surrounding Wabanaki tribes. Today the mountain is protected within the boundaries of Baxter State Park and the area is popular for hiking, camping, fishing, whitewater rafting, moose watching and winter sports. The mountain is also the terminus of the Appalachian Trail. It is truly one of the most beautiful areas within what is now the state of Maine.

Mount Katahdin Website